Tennessee Flat Top Box Lyrics - Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash Classic Cash: Hall of Fame Series cover art
Credits
publisher: ©Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.
writers: Johnny R. Cash
release date: 1988
genres: Folk, World, & Country
styles: Country
length: 3:09
bass: Jimmy Tittle
brass: Bob Lewin and Jack Hale, Jr.
drums (drum set): W.S. Holland
electric guitar: Bob Wootton
guitar: Jim Soldi and Johnny Cash
lead vocals: Johnny Cash
piano: Earl Poole Ball
composer: Johnny Cash
lyricist: Johnny Cash
In a little cabaret in a South Texas border town,
Sat a boy and his guitar, and the people came from miles around.
And all the girls from there to Austin,
Were slipping away from home and putting jewelery in hock.
To take the trip, to go and listen,
To the little dark-haired boy who played the Tennessee flat top box.

And he would play,

Well, he couldn't ride or wrangle, and he never cared to make a dime.
But give him his guitar, and he'd be happy all the time.
And all the girls from nine to ninety,
Were snapping fingers, tapping toes, and begging him: "Don't stop."
And hypnotized and fascinated,
By the little dark-haired boy who played the Tennessee flat top box.

And he would play,

Then one day he was gone, and no one ever saw him 'round,
He'd vanished like the breeze, they forgot him in the little town.
But all the girls still dreamed about him.
And hung around the cabaret until the doors were locked.
And then one day on the Hit Parade,
Was a little dark-haired boy who played the Tennessee flat top box.

And he would play



Tracklist
CD 1
  • 1 Get Rhythm
  • 2 Tennessee Flat Top Box
  • 3 The Long Black Veil
  • 4 Thing Called Love
  • 5 I Still Miss Someone
  • 6 Cry! Cry! Cry!
  • 7 Blue Train
  • 8 Sunday Morning Coming Down
  • 9 Five Feet High and Rising
  • 10 Peace in the Valley
  • 11 Don’t Take Your Guns to Town
  • 12 Home of the Blues
  • 13 Guess Things Happen That Way
  • 14 I Got Stripes
  • 15 I Walk the Line
  • 16 Ring of Fire
  • 17 Ballad of Ira Hayes
  • 18 The Ways of a Woman in Love
  • 19 Folsom Prison Blues
  • 20 Supper Time