Let the People Sing Album

Artist(s): Wolfe Tones

Cover Art

Wolfe Tones Let the People Sing Cover Art

Tracklist

Snowy Breasted Pearl

length: 3:25

There's a colleen fair as May
For a year and for a day
I have sought by every way
Her heart to gain.
There's no art of tongue or eye
Fond youths with maidens try
But I've tried with ceaseless sigh
Yet tried in vain.

If to France or far off Spain
She crossed the wat'ry main
To see her face again the seas I'd brave
And if it's heaven's decree
That mine she'll never be
May the Son of Mary me in mercy save.

But a kiss with welcome bland
And the touch of thy fair hand
Are all that I demand
Would'st thou not spurn
For if not mine, dear girl
My snowy breasted pearl
May I never from the fair
With life return.

Sean South of Garryowen

length: 3:29
Sad are the homes round Garryowen
Since they lost their joy and pride
And the banshee cry links every vale
Around the Shannon side that city of the ancient walls
the broken treaty stone, undying fame surrounds your name, Sean South from Garryowen

T'was on a dreary New Years Eve
As the shades of night came down
A lorry load of volunteers approached the border town
There were men from Dublin and from Cork, Fermanagh and Tyrone
And the leader was a Limerick man - Sean South from Garryowen

As they moved along the street up to the barracks door
They scorned the danger they might face
Their fate that lay instore
They were fighting for old Ireland to claim their very own
And the foremost of that gallant band
Was South from Garryowen

But the seargent spied their daring plan
He spied them trough the door
The Sten guns and the rifles a hail of death did pour
And when that awful night had passed
Two men lay cold a stone
There was one from near the border and one from Garryowen

No more wil he hear the seagull's cry
Over the murmurring Shannon tide
For he fell beneath a Northern sky brave Hanlon by his side
They have gone to join that gallant band
Of Plunkett, Pearse and Tone
A martyr for old Ireland
Sean South from Garryowen

Twice Daily

length: 2:48
When I was a lad I was so glad
To go out in the daytime
With me fork, a bottle and a cork
To help out in the haytime
Tossin' hay one fine day
I met young Lucy Bailey
And I said my dear "Are you often here"
She said "Yes sir, twice daily"

Well we had such fun in the summer sun
Lucy was so thrillin'
So sweet and pure but I wasn't sure
If that girl was willin'
Until one day among the hay
We were working gaily
When she up's and slips and her garters ripped
And I went there twice daily

Did the rum do dee, did de rum do da
Did the rum da do do randy
Did the rye do dee, did the rye do da
Did the rye do dee, twice daily

Well Lucy's dad he was very mad
He chased me'round the haybarn
He said "You son, now you've had your fun
The time has come to pay now"
"The girl you'll wed", the old man said
As he waved his shotgun gaily
"If you don't", he says, "where I'll put the lead
You won't sit there twice daily"

So the very next day in the month of May
We held the ceremony
And we paid off the vicar with a gallon of liquor
And we rode to church on a pony
To Lucy's joy we had a boy
What a little darlin'
He's round and fat as a Cheshire cat
As perky as a starlin'

Did the rum do dee, did de rum do da
Did the rum da do do randy
Did the rye do dee, did the rye do da
Did the rye do dee, twice daily

Well now we're old, our story's told
Forty years together
Tho' we often stray where we tossed the hay
In that old time summer weather
Well, kids we've got ten or more
We goes on quiet gaily
Tho' I'm old and grey when I've got me way
I still go there twice daily

Did the rum do dee, did de rum do da
Did the rum da do do randy
Did the rye do dee, did the rye do da
Did the rye do dee, twice daily

James Connolly

length: 5:28
Collected and Arranged by The Wolfe Tones

The man was all shot through that came to day into the Barrack Square

And a soldier I, I am not proud to say that we killed him there

They brought him from the prison hospital and to see him in that chair

I swear his smile would, would far more quickly call a man to prayer

Maybe, maybe I don't understand this thing that makes these rebels die

Yet all men love freedom and the spring clear in the sky

I wouldn't do this deed again for all that I hold by

As I gazed down my rifle at his breast but then, then a soldier I.

They say he was different, kindly too apart from all the rest.

A lover of the poor-his wounds ill dressed.

He faced us like a man who knew a greater pain

Than blows or bullets ere the world began: died he in vain

Ready, Present, and him just smiling, Christ I felt my rifle shake

His wounds all open and around his chair a pool of blood

And I swear his lips said, "fire" before my rifle shot that cursed lead

And I, I was picked to kill a man like that, James Connolly



A great crowd had gathered outside of Kilmainham

Their heads all uncovered, they knelt to the ground.

For inside that grim prison

Lay a great Irish soldier

His life for his country about to lay down.

He went to his death like a true son of Ireland

The firing party he bravely did face

Then the order rang out: Present arms and fire

James Connolly fell into a ready-made grave

The black flag was hoisted, the cruel deed was over

Gone was the man who loved Ireland so well

There was many a sad heart in Dublin that morning

When they murdered James Connolly-. the Irish rebel

Don't Stop Me Now

length: 3:04
Now darkness fills the sky
Where once the summer sun did shine
Where lighter shades of blue were true
And the heavens they were mine
Now they are gone and now I seem to realize
That a storm has entered o'er my paradise

And it stopped the golden sunlight coming throuch my door
And the daybreak never comes just like it did before
Just like it did before

Through the sleepy hours at night
This shady figure fills my door
And casts its magic spell to swell
The memories of my mind
Don't stop me now, I'm the man that on the moon did walk
Don't stop me now, I'm the Jack that climbed the beanstalk

And it stopped the golden sunlight coming throuch my door
And the daybreak never comes just like it did before
Just like it did before

I spoke to it sometimes
And then it would speak back to me
Perhaps now that its me,
You see l'm dreamin' I am me
Don't stop me now, I m a winner in the Olympic Games
Don't stop me now, I'm the circus man that jumps through flames

And it stopped the golden sunlight coming throuch my door
And the daybreak never comes just like it did before
Just like it did before

The hidden drums of silence
Seemed to captivate my busy mind
And spoke to me somehow to show
What world was really mine
Then I awake and find my old familiar things upon the shelf
My watch and tie and signet ring

Táim in Arréars

length: 3:33

TA'IM IN ARREARS
(Capo on 5th fret)

Here's a (C)health to me mother-in-(G)law now
I (C)ne'er at a fair saw her (F)yet
You (C)blackguard don't (F)drink a drop (G)with me
Your (C)conduct I'll (F)never for(C)get
My money you (F)freely have (G)squandered
(C)Treated me (F)rarely there (G7)now
(C)Drank both me (F)goose and me (G)gander
And to(C)night you'll be (F)drinking me (C)cow

Chorus:
Oh (C)Ta'im in ar(F)rears, in ar(G)rears
(C)Ta'im in ar(F)rears, i dti on (G7)ol
(C)Ta'im in ar(F)rears, in ar(G)rears
And I'm (C)feared I'll not (F)pay ever(C)more

I'm a fellow without any shame now
Without a good name to report
That would say to his darling wife's mother
He'd still carry on in this sort
I surely must travel through Éirinn
Take to the road till I die
As on me way I'll be faring
You'll still hear my neighbours all cry

I'd give you of cows a full twenty
Of calves I would give you a score
I'd give you me money in plenty
If you'll promise to drink here no more
A thousand good cows you can give me
Ten acres a million or more
I could swear to give over me drinking
I'd still pay a call to this door

There's a band of grey mud 'round me hat now
In my coat there is many a tear
Like a string is my old caravat now
And oh me poor wig is thread-bare
I'll buy me a shining new jacket
A wig that's all powdered galore
And I'll kick up a mighty fine racket
When I come into money once more

Come Out Ye Black & Tans

length: 3:04
writer: Dominic Behan
I was born on a Dublin street where the royal drums did beat,
And those loving English feet they tramped all over us,
And each and every night when me father came home tight
He'd invite the neighbors outside with this chorus:

Come out ye Black and Tans, come out and fight me like a man,
Show your wife how you won medals down in Flanders,
Tell them how the IRA made you run like hell away
From the green and lovely lanes of Killashandra.

Come tell us how you slew them poor Arabs two by two,
Like the Zulus they had spears and bows and arrows,
How you bravely faced each one with your 16-pounder gun,
And you frightened them poor natives to their marrow.

Come out ye Black and Tans, come out and fight me like a man,
Show your wife how you won medals down in Flanders,
Tell them how the IRA made you run like hell away
From the green and lovely lanes of Killashandra.

Come let us hear you tell how you slandered great Parnell,
When you thought him well and truly persecuted,
Where are the sneers and jeers that you bravely let us hear
When our heroes of '16 were executed?

Come out ye Black and Tans, come out and fight me like a man,
Show your wife how you won medals down in Flanders,
Tell them how the IRA made you run like hell away
From the green and lovely lanes of Killashandra.

Well the day is coming fast and the time is here at last,
When each yeoman will be cut aside before us,
And if there be a need, sure me kids would sing, "Godspeed,"
With a verse or two of Stephen Behan's chorus:

Come out ye Black and Tans, come out and fight me like a man,
Show your wife how you won medals down in Flanders,
Tell them how the IRA made you run like hell away
From the green and lovely lanes of Killashandra.

On the One Road

length: 3:03
(Chorus)
We're on the one road
Sharing the one load
We're on the road to God knows where
We're on the one road
It may be the wrong road
But we're together now who cares
North men, South men, comrades all
Dublin, Belfast, Cork and Donegal
We're on the one road swinging along
Singing a soldier's song

Though we've had our troubles now and then
Now is the time to make them up again
Sure aren't we all Irish anyhow
Now is the time to step together now

(Chorus repeat)

Tinker, tailor, every mother's son
Butcher, baker shouldering his gun
Rich man, poor man, every man in line
All together just like Old Land Syne

(Chorus repeat)

Night is darkest just before the dawn
From dissention Ireland is reborn
Soon we'll all be United Irishmen
Make our land a Nation Once Again

(Chorus repeat)

The Men Behind the Wire

length: 2:39
Armoured cars and tanks and guns
Came to take away our sons
But every man must stand behind
The men behind the wire

Through the little streets of Belfast
In the dark of early morn
British soldiers came marauding
Wrecking little homes with scorn

Heedless of the crying children
Cragging fathers from their beds
Beating sons while helpless mothers
Watched the blood poor from their heads

Not for them a judge and jury
Nor indeed a trial at all
But being Irish means you´re guilty
So we´re guilty one and all

Round the world the truth will echo
Cromwell´s men are here again
England´s name again is sullied
In the eyes of honest men.

Proud we march behind our banner
Firm we´ll stand behind our men
We will have them free to help us
Build a nation once again

On the people step together
Proudly march on their way
Never fear never falter
Till the boys are home to stay

For Ireland I'd Not Tell Her Name

length: 3:36

Last eve as I wandered quiet near
To the border's of my little farm
A beautiful maiden appeared
Whose loveliness caused my heart's harm

By her daring and love smitten sour
And the words from her sweet lips that came
To meet her I raced the field o'er
But for Ireland I'd not tell her name

If this beauty but my words would heed
The words that I speak would be true
I'd help her in every need
And indeed all her work I would do

To win one fond kiss from my love
I'd read her romances of fame
Her champion I daily would prove
But for Ireland I'd not tell her name

There's a beautiful stately young maid
At the nearing of my little farm
She's welcoming kind unafraid
Her smile is both childlike and warm

Her gold hair in masses that grows
Like amber and sheen is that same
And the bloom in her cheeks like the rose
But for Ireland I'd not tell her name

Paddy Lie Back

length: 3:03
Paddy lay Back

T'was[G] a cold and frosty[C] morning in Sep[G]tem[Em]ber
And[G] all of me money it was[A] spent,,[D]
Where it[G] went to oh[C] Lord I cant re[G]mem[Em]ber
So[G] down to the[D] shipping office[G] went

Oh[G] Paddy lie[C] back,oh Paddy lie back,
Take in your[G] slack,take in your slack
Take your turn put[Em] on your hats and jump fo[A]r board,,[D]
About[G] ship's for[C] England boys be[G] handy
For we'er[G] bound for Valp[C]arai so in the[G] morn

Last night there was a great demand for sailors
For the colonies for Frisco and for France
So I slipped aboard a lively barque,the Hotspur
And was paralytic drunk before before we went

There were Frenchmen,there were Germans there were Russians
There were jolly jacks came just across from from France
And not one of them could speak a word of English
But they'd awnser to the name of Bill or Dan

I woke up in the morning sick and sore
I wished I'd never sailed to sea once more
When a voice it came thundering through the floor
Get up and pay attention to your name

Well I wished that I was safely in the boozer
With Molly or with peggy on me knee
And I know exactly what I'd like to do now
And if you were here you'd do the same as me

The First of May

length: 2:53
When I was small, and Christmas trees were tall
We used to love while others used to play
Don't ask me why, but time has passed us by
Someone else moved in from far away

Now we are tall, and Christmas trees are small
And you don't ask the time of day
But you and I, our love will never die
But guess we'll cry come first of May

The apple tree that grew for you and me
I watched the apples falling one by one
And I recall the moment of them all
The day I kissed your cheek and you were mine

Now we are tall, and Christmas trees are small
And you don't ask the time of day
But you and I, our love will never die
But guess we'll cry come first of May

When I was small, and Christmas trees were tall
Do do do do do do do do do
Don't ask me why, but time has passed us by
Someone else moved in from far away

Long Kesh

length: 3:25
Long Kesh

There's[G] a place just[C] outside[G] Lisburn
It's a place that's[D] known to[G] few
Where a[C] group of[D] Irish re[G]bels
Are[C] held by[D] Faulkner's[G] crew
They are forced to[D] live in[G] cages
Like the inmates[D] of Belle[G]vue
But the sperit of[D] 19[G]16
Will always[D] see them[G] through

The men in this vile place
They come from far and near
Some from the Derry Bogside
And Omagh town so near
And some of them from Belfast
From the markets and the Falls
From the narrow streets of Ardoyne
And all around Tyrone

On that black day in August
When Faulkner showed his hand
He thought that by internment
He could break our gallant band
But the boys from Ballymurphy
How they showed the way that night
How they thaught those English soldiers
How Irish men could fight

Long Kesh it's known to everyone
The system must be broke
Ardoyne the New Lodge and the Falls
Will see the system choke
No more the special powers act
The means will envoke
And Long Kesh will be the U stone
Of which the system's broke

A word now Irish people
No matter where you are
Remember our brave rebels
In Long Kesh this year
And by civil disobeience
Or any other way
We'll make a stand until the day
Each one of them are free

A Nation Once Again

length: 2:58

When boyhood's fire was in my blood
I read of ancient freemen,
For Greece and Rome who bravely stood,
Three hundred men and three men;
And then I prayed I yet might see
Our fetters rent in twain,
And Ireland, long a province, be.
A Nation once again!

A Nation once again,
A Nation once again,
And lreland, long a province, be
A Nation once again!

And from that time, through wildest woe,
That hope has shone a far light,
Nor could love's brightest summer glow
Outshine that solemn starlight;
It seemed to watch above my head
In forum, field and fane,
Its angel voice sang round my bed,
A Nation once again!

It whisper'd too, that freedom's ark
And service high and holy,
Would be profaned by feelings dark
And passions vain or lowly;
For, Freedom comes from God's right hand,
And needs a Godly train;
And righteous men must make our land
A Nation once again!

So, as I grew from boy to man,
I bent me to that bidding
My spirit of each selfish plan
And cruel passion ridding;
For, thus I hoped some day to aid,
Oh, can such hope be vain ?
When my dear country shall be made
A Nation once again!